Signs That Your Pet Needs Emergency Medical Treatment

Signs That Your Pet Needs Emergency Medical Treatment

If you decide to take your pet to an emergency vet may be difficult and stressful. It’s critical for pet owners to know what to look for as these symptoms could indicate an illness that could be deadly if not treated promptly.

It’s difficult to know if your pet’s health is truly a medical emergency or not when you’re the pet owner. Certain situations are best left until the next day when you see your veterinarian. If, however, you’re worried, you must consult a doctor or an ER vet immediately, regardless of the time.

Contacting your veterinarian during an emergency is one of your first steps. Write down the scenario, and your veterinarian can instruct you on how to offer first aid and then move your pet securely. It is also advisable to keep an emergency kit in your house.

Dog Medical Emergencies

Unfortunately, just like humans, pets can be affected by medical emergencies. The following suggestions may aid in keeping your pet safe until they receive professional assistance.

Vomiting

There are numerous reasons cats and dogs puke. There is a joke between veterinarians that cats vomit to have entertainment. One bout of vomiting typically doesn’t necessitate a trip to the animal emergency room.

If your pet is showing typical vomiting symptoms like blood in the vomit or the vomit appears like coffee grounds, they should be evaluated. Finding foreign matter before it gets obstructed and detecting disorders like endocrine and metabolic diseases could save lives if performed early. Look up “Dog wellness plan at Bullard Animal Hospital in Austell” for the best results.

Swollen Abdomen

Imagine that your dog’s stomach becomes more round and tight, making it unpleasant. It might indicate a buildup of fluid caused by heart disease or severe inflammation or infection of the abdomen.

It could also mean the possibility of a potentially life-threatening buildup in your dog’s stomach and intestines. Your pet may need an emergency operation if the organs twist around themselves.

In cats, especially males, an obstruction in the urinary tract can cause the abdomen to seem more substantial than usual. Urinary obstructions could quickly turn life-threatening. An ER visit is necessary if your male cat develops a large stomach, makes loud noises, and strains during peeing. 

Gum Color

The usual gum color for both cats and dogs is pinkish bubble gum. An urgent assessment is required if your pet’s gums are barely visible pale pink, blue, purple, white, or gray. A swollen gum indicates inadequate circulation due to abnormal blood pressure or low oxygenation.

Specific mucous membranes of pets are colored, meaning their gums and skin are usually gray or black. The color of gums can be a more inaccurate indicator of health in this scenario. Consult your family veterinarian or your closest emergency facility If you have any questions. Take your pet to a dog dentist for more details on their oral health.

Collapse

Seizures, sudden changes in cardiac rhythm, irregular blood flow through the heart, or anemia (few red blood cells) may cause collapses or even loss of consciousness. If your pet becomes unresponsive and unconscious, you should seek medical attention. Visit a veterinary website to learn more.

Difficulty Breathing

If your pet cannot take a breath or is shaking or wheezing, they are suffering from respiratory pain. Various factors can trigger respiratory distress in dogs, but it’s most commonly linked to the respiratory tract, nose, breathing, and heart issues. If your pet cannot breathe, they are in immediate danger and should be sent to an emergency animal facility.